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30 Years of ARTC – All Hallows’ Moon, Dragon Con 2000

This being our 30th anniversary, we thought we’d dip back into the past and recap some of our previous performances, triumphs and tragedies, in a series of posts. And don’t forget our Chronology! It’s not as detailed, but it really shows the growth of ARTC over the years. You can see all of the photos in their full size on our Flickr album!

Continuing our annual appearances at Dragon Con, and 2000 was a real doozy. First, it included one of Thomas E. Fuller’s best original pieces, All Hallows’ Moon. But we were also priveleged to perform an episode of Ron N. Butler’s Rory Rammer, Space Marshal series, The Queen of the Spaceways with Ted Raimi, Alexandra Tydings, and Claire Stansfield! All that plus Zap thy Neighbor by James P. Hogan, and you’ve got a stellar lineup!

Doug Kaye, Fiona K. Leonard, and Thomas E. Fuller set the scene in
Doug Kaye, Fiona K. Leonard, and Thomas E. Fuller set the scene in “All Hallows’ Moon”

ARTC doesn’t normally do costumes. It’s actually a long-running debate within the company – how to create visual appeal for a medium that doesn’t normally rely on visual appeal at all! But when you’re performing live, the audience expects to be able to see something and asking them to close their eyes can lead to inopportune snoring, so occasionally we give costumes a try.

David Benedict, Ron N. Butler, William L. Brown, Doug Kaye, Fiona K. Leonard, Daniel W. Kiernan, and Thomas E. Fuller portray the inhabitants of Mother Lode, New Mexico.
David Benedict, Ron N. Butler, William L. Brown, Doug Kaye, Fiona K. Leonard, Daniel W. Kiernan, and Thomas E. Fuller portray the inhabitants of Mother Lode, New Mexico.

Here’s another example of the costuming work for this piece. We have been very lucky to have a number of professional costumers work with ARTC in the past to help us on occasions such as this.

William L. Brown accepts the first ARTC Lifetime Achievement Award
William L. Brown accepts the first ARTC Lifetime Achievement Award

In 2000 we also debuted the ARTC Lifetime Achievement Award for excellence in audio. Presented first to ARTC founder William L. Brown and informally known as the “Brownie”, the award was renamed as the Thomas E. Fuller Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003.

Ted Raimi, Karen Barrett, and Claire Stansfield perform in
Ted Raimi, Karen Barrett, and Claire Stansfield perform in Rory Rammer, Space Marshal: Queen of the Spaceways as Alexandra Tydings waits for her cue.

We also had the great honor of performing with three of the stars of Xena, Warrior Princess that year. Ted Raimi hammed it up as Rory Rammer, turning in an uproarious performance…that also happened to be about half an hour longer than we’d scheduled it for! Claire Stansfield and Alexandra Tydings were also spectacular in the roles of Michiko Sakai and Aphrodite DeHavilland.

Alexandra Tydings and Ted Raimi
Alexandra Tydings and Ted Raimi

This performance is still recalled fondly by those members of ARTC who were lucky enough to be present.

We hope you’re enjoying this look back at ARTC! If so, let us know! And don’t forget that your support is extremely important. Tell your friends! Tell your family! Buy a CD or make a donation!

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30 Years of ARTC – Throne of Shadows, Dragon Con 1999

This being our 30th anniversary, we thought we’d dip back into the past and recap some of our previous performances, triumphs and tragedies, in a series of posts. And don’t forget our Chronology! It’s not as detailed, but it really shows the growth of ARTC over the years. You can see all of the photos in their full size on our Flickr album!

ARTC has been priveleged to perform at every single Dragon Con since the very beginning back in 1987. In 1999 we debuted the audio version of Thomas E. Fuller’s Throne of Shadows: The Last Relic of the Empire. It’s a complex story involving the Emperor of Mexico, an actress pushed to her limits of sanity, and an alternate history of the way things really went in 1867. But leaving geopolitics aside for a moment, the story is really about the love that Maximilian shared with his wife Carlota and how that love transcended death and madness.

The cast of
The cast of “Throne of Shadows”

In this photo we see an extremely young Sarah Taylor as the fictional Sofia, along with several other members of the cast of the production. We managed to get Sarah into the studio to record her lines while she still sounded like a girl instead of the young woman she has grown up to be. Also pictured, Trudy Leonard as Carlota, Dena Friedman Williams as the actress Victoria Forell, and Thomas E. Fuller as Emperor Maximilian.

Foley for
Foley for “Throne of Shadows”

Foley for Throne of Shadows was fairly involved. There was lots of walking around on castle floors when the scenes were set in Bavaria, but when the scenes magically shifted to the Mexican Empire in 1867, it was occasionally necessary to have dense foliage available. One side set in winter, the other in a glorious Mexican spring.

Brad Weage at the keyboard
Brad Weage at the keyboard

Brad Weage composed the haunting score, including the essential “Imperial Waltz”. For the final studio production, Joel Abbott provided a good deal of a replacement score, due to Brad’s original compositions being unavailable, but the “Imperial Waltz” lives on!

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The Doom of the Mummy part 1 of 4

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Bill Kronick as Dr Creighton AlastairIn 2008 we performed The Doom of the Mummy at Dragon Con. The performance was dedicated to Thomas E. Fuller, who had already provided us with retellings of the classic monster stories The Passion of Frankenstein and The Brides of Dracula (not to mention an adaptation of The Invisible Man). Although he’d never really talked about it, it seemed natural to assume that he would follow those up one day with more audio dramas in the vein of the Universal Monsters by also retelling the time-honored tales of the wolfman, the mummy, and several others in that same vein.

Unfortunately, Thomas passed away in 2002 and we were never able to see what his vision for these classic monsters might have been. We are forced to fill the void ourselves, and have begun to do so with The Doom of the Mummy by William Alan Ritch and The Wood-Bound Werewolf by Kelley S. Ceccato.

Now, here in 2014, we dedicate this performance again, this time to Bill Kronick, himself recently passed away. Bill was a marvelous voice talent, a skilled improviser, and a great friend to all who knew him. We are proud to present his work here as Dr. Creighton Alastair.

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30 Years of ARTC – Decatur Arts Festival 1999

This being our 30th anniversary, we thought we’d dip back into the past and recap some of our previous performances, triumphs and tragedies, in a series of posts. And don’t forget our Chronology! It’s not as detailed, but it really shows the growth of ARTC over the years.

ARTC has performed at the Decatur Arts Festival on five separate occasions. We loved our experiences there, but the fact of the matter is that outdoor venues aren’t kind to us from an acoustic point of view, and often from a weather point of view. Our 2004 Frontier Days performance was particularly memorable. Ask us about it sometime! You can see all of the photos in their full size on our Flickr album!

But, that said, we did get appreciative audiences. Here’s a few of our favorite moments from the show!

Trudy Leonard, Clair W. Kiernan, Tony Trauring, and Daniel Taylor perform.
Trudy Leonard, Clair W. Kiernan, Tony Trauring, and Daniel Taylor perform.

As you can see, we’re in a tent. It was a lovely sunny day and the tent helped keep the sun off our heads. Rain would have been a completely different story.

Bill Ritch and Thomas Fuller look over the technical side of things.
Bill Ritch and Thomas Fuller look over the technical side of things.

One of the great things about this festival was our opportunity to connect with some of our younger fans (and fans-to-be!).

Old tech helped make this show possible.
Check out the ancient technology!

Trudy Leonard, Daniel W. Kiernan, Clair W. Kiernan, Tony Trauring, and Daniel Taylor are on the stage playing to a decent audience, but what’s really interesting here is the tech in the foreground. Check that stuff out. An actual tape deck! And that laptop had to weigh ten pounds. Not pictured: A ton of other stuff we don’t have to use anymore thanks to modern technology. Now we lug around completely different (but equally heavy) stuff!

More older technology in use for the show
More ancient tech

Some of it is pictured here. But that’s still not all of it.

Foley table for the show
Foley work

Foley stays pretty much the same. I think we used some of those props at our last performance!

Brad Weage at the keyboard
Brad Weage at the keyboard

And what trip down memory lane would be complete without Brad Weage? Here he is right at home behind his keyboard.

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30 Years of ARTC – The Man Who Traveled in Elephants

This being our 30th anniversary, we thought we’d dip back into the past and recap some of our previous performances, triumphs and tragedies, in a series of posts. And don’t forget our Chronology! It’s not as detailed, but it really shows the growth of ARTC over the years.

In 1998, ARTC experienced an important moment in its history as we unveiled the first in our Dean’s List series of Robert A. Heinlein adaptations, The Man Who Traveled in Elephants. And, boy, did we go all out. You can see all of the below photos at full size in our Flickr gallery.

First, if you’ve read the story, you may notice that it’s not quite like anything else that Heinlein wrote for the most part. In fact, Bill Ritch and Brad Linaweaver, who were instrumental in helping us get the rights from Virginia Heinlein to do this adaptation, described it as “Bradburyesque,” referring to legendary science fiction writer Ray Bradbury. Wouldn’t it be fun, we imagined, if we could get Ray Bradbury to introduce us?

Ray Bradbury introduces Atlanta Radio Theatre Company at Dragon Con 1998
Ray Bradbury introduces Atlanta Radio Theatre Company at Dragon Con 1998.

So that happened. You can even hear the recording of the introduction on our studio production of the script.* Then, how about a bunch of guest stars. Like maybe Anthony Daniels. Or even Harlan Ellison, a legendary writer in his own right!

Anthony Daniels and Harlan Ellison share a stage with Daniel Taylor of ARTC.
Anthony Daniels and Harlan Ellison share a stage with Daniel Taylor of ARTC.

So that happened, too. And then we’d cap the whole thing off by making it a tribute to the Dean of American Science Fiction himself.

A tribute to Robert A. Heinlein with Harlan Ellison, Brad Linaweaver, and William Alan Ritch.
A tribute to Robert A. Heinlein with Harlan Ellison, Brad Linaweaver, and William Alan Ritch.

The presence of scream queen Brinke Stevens in our opening piece, A Real Babe (by Brad Linaweaver, adapted for audio by William Alan Ritch) was just the icing on the cake.

Scream queen Brinke Stevens in
Scream queen Brinke Stevens in “A Real Babe”.

It was a performance for the ages. It was something nobody on the stage will ever forget.

*The Man Who Traveled in Elephants is currently available for sale exclusively at our live performances. We are hopeful to bring it back to general release in the near future through all of our digital and mail order distributors.

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221b Con

Come hear Holmes in an entirely new light – through the magnifying lens of the mind’s ear, where things might become a little distorted.  First, we’ll have another episode of Dr. Will Ward, Science Wizard: Sherlock Gnomes by Dave Schroeder, and then we’ll do our own take on one of the most famous duos in history with Dr. Geoffry Stanhope, Investigator of Occult Phenomena: The Maker of Dreams by Thomas E. Fuller.  And in between… a little from Mr. Doyle himself.  April 13-14, 2013.

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Rory Rammer, Space Marshal: The Murder of Skip Sagan

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This month we bring you Rory Rammer, Space Marshal: The Murder of Skip Sagan, performed live at LibertyCon, July 21, 2012