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The Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015) Day 7

Welcome to the Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015 edition)! Leading up to our December 12 and 13 performances at the Academy Theatre in Stockbridge, we’ll be bringing you our own take on this holiday classic!

On the third day of An Atlanta Christmas, my true love gave to me…seven Christmas memories…
six colored microphones
five old CDs!
four Foley artists
three singers singing
two Stockbridge shows
And an interview on WABE!

What’s An Atlanta Christmas all about, you ask? At its root, it’s about memories. Memories of Christmases past, our city’s past, and our own past. And who doesn’t wax nostalgic at this time of year? For good or bad, the season often causes us to reflect on the highs and lows throughout our lives, often accompanied by a yearning to return to the good times and a wish for things to be better or promises to improve.

At this year’s performance we will offer seven of our own favorite memories. Here’s the lineup for this year’s show (subject to change)!

Are You Lonely Tonight?
Are You Lonely Tonight?

Opening – Welcome one and all to our family Christmas!
Cut-Out Christmas – A young couple living through the Great Depression find a unique way to lift themselves up through the spirit of giving.
Are You Lonely Tonight? – The office Christmas party doesn’t always create the best memories. But sometimes it does.
The Legend of the Poinsettia – How did the poinsettia become a symbol of Christmas? Find out in this hilarious audio drama that tells the story of the fourth wise man who didn’t make the trip to Bethlehem.
The Experts – The thing you don’t often get in the South at Christmastime is snow. More often we get ice. And that’s a totally different thing to try to drive on.
Davy Crockett and Me – What does television have to do with Christmas in the 1950s? A lot, actually.
Blue Hannukchristmas Carol – This fan (and cast!) favorite returns again to tell the story of three spirits trying to overcome a case of mistaken identity to bring the true joy of Hannukah back into a young Jew’s life.

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The Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015) Day 6

Welcome to the Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015 edition)! Leading up to our December 12 and 13 performances at the Academy Theatre in Stockbridge, we’ll be bringing you our own take on this holiday classic!

On the third day of An Atlanta Christmas, my true love gave to me…six colored microphones…
five old CDs!
four Foley artists
three singers singing
two Stockbridge shows
And an interview on WABE!

Microphones are, of course, essential to audio drama. Here at ARTC we like to color-code them to make sure the actors know where to go. Because, y’know, actors. If you’ve ever seen us live before the pattern will look very familiar. And if you haven’t, now’s your chance!

An Atlanta Christmas 2009
The color-coded microphones match the station colors. Please move to the center of the theatre and away from the doors.
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The Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015) Day 5

Welcome to the Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015 edition)! Leading up to our December 12 and 13 performances at the Academy Theatre in Stockbridge, we’ll be bringing you our own take on this holiday classic!

On the third day of An Atlanta Christmas, my true love gave to me…five old CDs!
four Foley artists
three singers singing
two Stockbridge shows
And an interview on WABE!

The CD may not be as popular as it once was, but we’ve still got ’em and, let’s face it, it’s nice to have something tangible to put under the tree. Yes, we can all wrap up an empty box or put gift cards in an envelope, but think back to when you were a kid. Which presents were the most intriguing? The big ones! What could it possibly be??

(Incidentally, just as a matter of trivia, if you stacked every ARTC CD available up and wrapped them as a group, they’d be about 13.5″ tall by 5.25″ wide by 7.5″ deep. Give or take. Just sayin’.)

Also, today’s the last day for our 10% off sale! Check us out on Facebook and Twitter to get the discount code, but hurry! It expires today (12/5)!!

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The Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015) Day 2

Welcome to the Twelve Days of An Atlanta Christmas (2015 edition)! Leading up to our December 12 and 13 performances at the Academy Theatre in Stockbridge, we’ll be bringing you our own take on this holiday classic!

On the second day of An Atlanta Christmas, my true love gave to me…two Stockbridge shows
And an interview on WABE!

That’s right, two shows at the Academy Theatre in Stockbridge! December 12 at 8:00pm and December 13 at 2:30pm. In its 16th year, this Southern tradition just keeps going strong!

And the Stockbridge Community Arts Center is the perfect venue. This intimate space will let you enjoy the sounds of the show and give you a chance to mingle with the actors during the intermission and after the show!

The Legend of the Poinsettia in Stockbridge, 2014!
The Legend of the Poinsettia in Stockbridge, 2014!
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31 Years of ARTC: The Last Dragon to Avondale 2010

Continuing our look back at ARTC’s 31 years (thusfar!) with photos from our live performances. You can get a look at our whole history of combining adventures in sound with the thrill of live performance in our Chronology!

In this installment we bring you our appearance at the Academy Theatre in October 2010 where we performed The Last Dragon to Avondale along with The House Across the Way, featuring music by Brad Weage and Paul Mercer, and Rory Rammer, Space Marshal: The Colour of the Shadow of the Outsider Over the Mountains of Madness Out of Space. This performance was a benefit for Georgia Aquarium (it was one of our first benefit performances, in fact!) and also included special musical guest Rooke! Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

In 2010 we debuted our Partners in Imagination program, which strives to harness the power of multiple non-profit groups into something stronger by raising awareness amongst our various audiences and maybe even a little money as well.

Megan Tindale and Brian Troxell
Psst…there’s not a lot of money in this…at least not yet.

We had originally wanted to do this benefit for Georgia Aquarium with Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, but it became apparent very quickly that the script wouldn’t be ready in time, so we switched gears to The Last Dragon to Avondale. We felt that its focus on an “endangered species” made it a great fit.

Andrew Chiang and Sonya Arundar
“You keep telling yourself that, ok?”

Plus, we’d been performing at the Academy Theatre in Avondale Estates for a while at this point and to NOT perform this piece there would have been a crime against … well, a crime against something. Dragons, maybe.

The audience for
We got a good turnout, too!

We also had the privilege of working with some amazing musicians on this piece. There was Brad Weage.

Brad Weage
The very serious Brad Weage

Paul Mercer on violin. This was Paul’s first appearance with us!

Paul Mercer
The equally serious Paul Mercer

And our special musical guest, Rooke! Rooke has been around since the late 1980s and play a kind of (in their words) acid folk. We couldn’t quite get the whole band for this show, but we were thrilled to get Steven Sams, David Cater, and Keena Graham!

Steven Sams, Keena Graham, and David Cater
The not-quite-so-serious Rooke!

Rooke actually released an album of the recordings from this performance, so go get some great music!

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31 Years of ARTC: The Island of Dr. Moreau 2010

Continuing our look back at ARTC’s 31 years (thusfar!) with photos from our live performances. You can get a look at our whole history of combining adventures in sound with the thrill of live performance in our Chronology!

In this installment we bring you our appearance at the Academy Theatre in October 2010 where we performed The Island of Dr. Moreau, featuring music by The Ghosts Project, along with Inhuman Rights, Rory Rammer, Space Marshal: Set Loose the Dogs of Time, and Bumpers Crossroads: The Stray Dog. This performance was a benefit for the Atlanta Humane Society and also included special musical guest Julie Gribble! Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

Ok, first up, we know that using The Island of Dr. Moreau as a benefit for the Atlanta Humane Society sounds like a sick joke.

Fiona K. Leonard and Daniel Taylor.
Really sick.

But the truth was that we thought it was a perfect choice to highlight the plight of animals. While it’s true that nobody is trying to turn animals into humans surgically…

Hal Wiedeman, Rachel Wansker, Clair W. Kiernan, Daniel W. Kiernan
THAT WE KNOW OF…

…animals still face serious challenges every day due to neglect, maltreatment, habitat loss, and various other challenges. We wanted to help, and we felt that one of H. G. Wells’s more shocking stories might assist with that.

Ron N. Butler, Brian Troxell, Hal Wiedeman, J. E. Hurlburt
And goodness knows we can use all the help we can get.

This was also a musically packed performance. In addition to the usual brilliance of Alton Leonard, we were thrilled to be graced with The Ghosts Project!

Daniel Taylor, Clair W. Kiernan, Paul Mercer, Davis Petterson
There they are, lurking in the background. Try not to frighten them.

Not to mention our very special musical guest, Julie Gribble!

Julie Gribble
With suitably dramatic lighting

This performance also featured our Beast Men Chorus, led by Beastmistress Trudy Leonard.

The Beast Chorus
Try not to let THEM frighten YOU. (click this image for a larger version)

Not to mention one of the more violent Foley performances in ARTC’s history, involving a rubber mallet and a rather unfortunate butternut squash, used to simulate the cracking of the pantherwoman’s skull.

Butternut squash
Before (front)
butternut squash
Before (back) (it saw what happened to its predecessors…)
Sonya, Mary Ward, David Benedict
The dastardly deed
butternut squash...squashed
The evidence of the crime

Be sure to come see more crimes against produce as we mangle a grapefruit in our upcoming performances of The Passion of Frankenstein!

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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea part 4 of 4

Size: 7.81M Duration 17:03

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You know who tends to get all the glory in theatrical productions? Actors. You know who really does all the work? Technicians.

Tony Fuller on Foley sound effects
Tony Fuller is upset about not getting more glory.

Especially in audio drama, all actors have to do is show up and read their lines. We even get our scripts on stage!

Bob Zimmerman, audiomancer.
Bob Zimmerman is unimpressed by your reading skills.

Sure, acting requires diction and timing and the ability to convince an audience that you are a person other than the one you really are, but without the music and without the sound effects the giant squid just ain’t gonna attack The Nautilus.

Alton Leonard on music.
Alton Leonard can’t hear the actors complaining because he’s busy making music.

Plus, they’re the only ones who know which wires to plug into which other wires. Also, amplifiers are heavy. And ARTC brings a lot of stuff with us to our performances because you never know what you’re gonna need.

Giuliana Ward on recorded SFX
Giuliana Ward is too happy to be mad at actors for hogging the spotlight.
Giuliana Ward on recorded SFX.
Just kidding! She’ll cut you if she gets half a chance!

So the next time you’re at an ARTC performance, be sure to thank the technicians! (Also the floor manager, not pictured). It’s their show, too!

Bob Zimmerman and Alton Leonard with David Benedict
Making the magic happen. The magic of RADIO!
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31 Years of ARTC: An Atlanta Christmas 2009

Continuing our look back at ARTC’s 31 years (thusfar!) with photos from our live performances. You can get a look at our whole history of combining adventures in sound with the thrill of live performance in our Chronology!

In this installment we bring you our appearance at the Academy Theatre in Avondale Estates, which featured our 2009 performance of Blues for Johnny Raven by Thomas E. Fuller. Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

Ok, so it’s April and some people probably aren’t over last Christmas yet, but hey, it’s almost Easter so let’s get back into the holiday spirit with pictures from An Atlanta Christmas 2009!

Brad Weage
Brad Weage hitting all the right notes.
Lili Bilbao and Tennille Clayton on Foley
Write your own caption. We dare you.
Bill Kronick
Christmas, yo!
The cast of An Atlanta Christmas
A decent portion of the cast. The indecent portion is still backstage.
Brian Troxell, Daniel Kiernan, and Brian Phillips
The original beanie babies. And a giant snore.
Brian Troxell and Brian Phillips
It’s INTENSE! OOOH, YEAH!
Hal Wiedeman, Brian Troxell, and Daniel Kiernan
Hooray! …or whatever they were saying at the time.
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea part 3 of 4

Size: 10M Duration 17:46

[esplayer url = “http://traffic.libsyn.com/artc/ARTC151-20KLeagues03.mp3” height = “20” width = “80” title = “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea part 3 of 4”]

Sometimes in the podcast we give credit to the lighting designer. This may seem strange to listeners who have never seen us perform live because it’s not like we’re showing a video of the performance. Why would we give a credit to the lighting designer when you can’t see their work?

Daniel Taylor, Clair W. Kiernan, and Daniel W. Kiernan
Here’s some of their work. Happy now?

Because at a live performance, the lighting can enhance even an audio experience in ways that are difficult to describe. In Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea the characters are often underwater, outside of the Nautilus. During those times they can’t easily speak to each other, which makes dialogue challenging.

When we adapt H. P. Lovecraft, there often isn’t any dialogue at all, and so we just make some up. But in this case the passages where the characters are underwater are filled with lush descriptions of undersea life and landscapes that many of us will never see. We couldn’t just leave them out completely, nor could we make up dialogue that the other characters could never hear.

So we decided to create a music bed and have the characters each share their own perspective on what they were seeing through a triptych of interwoven monologues. In those instances the lighting helped the live audience adjust better to the transition.

Robert Drake
Robert Drake: Lightmaster

That lighting design is nearly always done by our host at the Academy Theatre, Robert Drake. So the next time you come out to see ARTC perform live anywhere where we have control over the lights (we usually don’t at our convention performances), ask if Robert’s around! And thank him for all his work!

ARTC’s next live show is at the Academy Theatre in Hapeville on March 28-29, 2015!

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31 Years of ARTC: Blues for Johnny Raven 2009

Continuing our look back at ARTC’s 31 years (thusfar!) with photos from our live performances. You can get a look at our whole history of combining adventures in sound with the thrill of live performance in our Chronology!

In this installment we bring you our appearance at the Academy Theatre in Avondale Estates, which featured our 2009 performance of Blues for Johnny Raven by Thomas E. Fuller. Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

This was our 25th Anniversary performance, and so we really went all out, as they say.

Bill Kronick and Alton Leonard
Bill Kronick and Alton Leonard going “all out”.

Y’know, we talk about how surprising it is that we’ve lasted so long. But the truth is that good storytelling is and has always been valued, so it really shouldn’t be that surprising.

Mary Buchanan and Megan Tindale backstage.
Ok, maybe it’s a little surprising.

This performance featured some of our favorites, some blasts from the past, and was a ton of fun. We got to see our founder William Brown take the stage again to recite The Mountain Whippoorwill by Stephen Vincent Benet…

William Brown on stage.
You don’t often see someone playing the “air violin”.

…as well as one of our favorite Rory Rammer episodes: The Asteroid of Love.

Fiona Leonard, Megan Tindale, and Ariel Kasten sing with Ethan Hurlburt observing.
Featuring the beautiful Android Sisters!

We were also treated to Brad Strickland’s An Arkham Home Companion.

Brad Strickland
Brad Strickland, just telling a regular old story about a tentacled monster trying to steal an eldritch book.

We were also joined by our frequent musical guest Juliana Finch!

Juliana Finch
Juliana rocks harder than you.

And, lest we forget, the main attraction, Blues for Johnny Raven!

 

Fiona Leonard and Daniel Kiernan
Raven (Daniel Kiernan) listens to the case brought to him by Gloria Kinsolving (Fiona Leonard).
Brad Strickland and Daniel Kiernan
Raven (Daniel Kiernan) consults with his friend and informant, Benny the Gospel (Brad Strickland)
Mary Buchanan
Mary Buchanan takes a break from playing the sax.
Ariel Kasten and Megan Tindale
We have no idea what’s going on in this picture.

Blues for Johnny Raven is in the final stages of post-production now and will be available soon, first by download and later on CD!