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31 Years of ARTC: The Man Who Traveled in Elephants 2008

We spent a good part of last year documenting our last 30 years through photographs of our live performances. But wouldn’t you know it, we ran out of year before we ran out of pictures! So we’re going to continue on! And don’t forget our Chronology for a look at our 30 (and counting!) years of live performance!

This week we bring you our appearance at Stage Door Players in 2008, which featured The Man Who Traveled in Elephants by Robert A. Heinlein. Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

We’re pressed for time this week, so we’re going to let the pictures speak for themselves this time! This was an amazing show, though, and we wanted to share it with all of you rather than let a week go by with no pictures.

The Man Who Traveled in Elephants is out of print at the moment, but we hope to bring it back later this year, with any luck!

Alton Leonard warms up before the dress rehearsal.
Alton Leonard warms up before the dress rehearsal.
The Foley team, Hal Wiedeman and Deanna Ameri, hard at work!
The Foley team, Hal Wiedeman and Deanna Ameri, hard at work!
The cast during dress rehearsal
Dress rehearsals are a bit more informal with us!
Our musical guest for this show, Juliana Finch!
Our musical guest for this show, Juliana Finch!
Nancy Skidmore at the ARTC sales table.
Nancy Skidmore staffs the sales table. Can we sell you a CD?
The other Foley team, Daniel Taylor, Deanna Ameri, and Jeff Baskin, along with actor Daniel Kiernan.
The other Foley team, Daniel Taylor, Deanna Ameri, and Jeff Baskin, along with actor Daniel Kiernan.

See you all again next week with more pictures!

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31 Years of ARTC: Dragon Con 2008 part 2 – Not a Typo

We spent a good part of last year documenting our last 30 years through photographs of our live performances. But wouldn’t you know it, we ran out of year before we ran out of pictures! So we’re going to continue on! And don’t forget our Chronology for a look at our 30 (and counting!) years of live performance!

This week we bring you our second appearance at Dragon Con in 2008, which featured a number of short subjects that we dubbed Not a Typo. Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

David Benedict examines his script.
David Benedict looks for typos. Finding none, the show proceeds.

Scheduling difficulties had prevented us from having a second show at Dragon Con for a couple of years, but when we came back we knew we had to bring some great shows.

Bill Kronick expresses himself at the microphone.
Did someone say great shows??

So we trotted out A Ship Named Francis, Haunter Hunters, Rory Rammer, Space Marshal: The Atomic Graveyard, Wikihistory, and The National Endowment for Space Art.

Jayne Lockhart addresses the microphone.
Jayne Lockhart swoons over the quality selection of scripts.

And, if we do say so ourselves, we totally blew the audience away!

Daniel Taylor addresses the microphone.
“You probably shouldn’t say that in today’s geopolitical world. Things like that aren’t always funny.” — No One Ever.

And we’ve been doing two shows at that fine convention ever since! Stay tuned to see what’s in store for this year’s convention. In fact, you could even sign up for the newsletter to keep current!

Jonathan Strickland addresses the microphone
We want YOU to sign up for “Breaking Radio Silence,” the ARTC newsletter.
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea part 1 of 4

Size: 11M Duration: 19:30
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In 2013 ARTC took our adaptation of Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea to the Academy Theatre in Avondale Estates for its debut, and thusfar only, performance.

As part of the performance, we commissioned a cake from our good friend Heather Schroeder with Sweets to the Sweet (edit: we just got word that Sweets to the Sweet is taking a bit of a hiatus. Sad face! Hopefully they’ll be back baking soon!). Check out how awesome this is!

Cake from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
Cake from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
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31 Years of ARTC: Dragon Con 2008 part 1 – The Doom of the Mummy

We spent a good part of last year documenting our last 30 years through photographs of our live performances. But wouldn’t you know it, we ran out of year before we ran out of pictures! So we’re going to continue on! And don’t forget our Chronology for a look at our 30 (and counting!) years of live performance!

This week we bring you our appearance at Dragon Con for The Doom of the Mummy in 2008. Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

In 2008 ARTC returned to the Dragon Con stage with our customary two shows. One of them was Bill Ritch’s The Doom of the MummyThe Doom of the Mummy was written to be a compliment to Thomas E. Fuller’s Universal Monsters series of retellings that includes The Passion of Frankenstein and The Brides of Dracula.

William Alan Ritch
Who is the real monster here?

The story tells of an ancient evil that returns through sorcery to menace mondern times. You know, your standard mummy story. But Ritch included his own nuances and personality into it, including an ambitious score that pushed our master composers Brad Weage and Alton Leonard to their limits.

Brad Weage at the keyboard.
Brad Weage, clearly succumbing to the pressure.

The score called for not just our usual synthesizer, but also ancient instruments such as the ugab and lyre and also incorporated a modern instrument in the cello, masterfully played by special guest Regina Maniqus.

Regina Maniquis at the cello.
Regina Maniquis at the cello.

The cast had a wonderful time, and we’re really looking forward to getting this piece into the studio for proper treatment!

Cast of
Cast of “Doom of the Mummy”
Ariel Kasten in
Ariel Kasten in “The Doom of the Mummy”
Clair W. Kiernan in
Clair W. Kiernan in “The Doom of the Mummy”
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31 Years of ARTC: Academy Theatre 2008

We spent a good part of last year documenting our last 30 years through photographs of our live performances. But wouldn’t you know it, we ran out of year before we ran out of pictures! So we’re going to continue on! And don’t forget our Chronology for a look at our 30 (and counting!) years of live performance!

This week we bring you our appearance at the Academy Theatre for The Colour Out of Space in 2008. Check out all the pictures on our Flickr album.

This performance was our first at the Academy Theatre’s Avondale Estates location. We walked in not really knowing what to expect, and to a certain degree not really knowing exactly where it was (if you ever visited the Avondale location, you probably know what I mean).

Stage setup at Academy Theatre
If we’d expected the setup to be done for us, we were sorely disappointed.

But the cast settled in nicely to their new home away from home.

The cast prior to the performance.
If I talk about them like they’re pets…well, there’s a reason for that.

During a show, communication is key. You might think that with all that talking going on on stage that getting anything else said would be difficult, and you’d be right. But we still need to communicate between backstage, onstage, and the techs in the back to ensure that timing is maintained and that when things go haywire the actors know what to do.

The cast onstage at the Academy Theatre.
One of those things we do is to hold our hands over our mics so they can be muted before we adjust them.

We also wear a lot of different hats. It’s tempting to think that we all have well-defined roles, but the truth is that everybody pitches in for a good show.

Foley for 'The Colour Out of Space'.
Here we see Clair Kiernan, normally a voice actor, at the Foley table. Clair, you sly devil.
Recorded sound effects for 'The Colour Out of Space'.
David Benedict running recorded sound effects. Complete with dramatic lighting!

We’re hard at work on the studio version of The Colour Out of Space right now, so look for that in the store soon! (If you’re reading this in 2020 and it’s still not there, send help).